Courses

Equality, Diversity and Rights in Health and Social Care

This unit aims to develop learners' understanding of concepts related to equality, diversity and rights in health and social care. Learners will be able to gain knowledge of discriminatory practice and means of combatting this. They will also develop understanding of national initiatives that promote anti-discriminatory practice in health and social care settings.

This unit investigates how equality, diversity and rights are central to the effective operation of health and social care services. It explores discriminatory practice and its potential effects on patients/service users, the promotion of anti-discriminatory practice by, for example, legislation and codes of practice, the application of this to the health or social care workplace, and national initiatives that promote anti-discriminatory practice.

 

Course Code:

NE41H4

Fee EU/Local Students

€450

 

 

Duration:

1 Semester

Awarding Body

EDI-AWARDING BODY
Entry Requirement:
  • Applicants must be a minimum of 18 years old
  • Applicants should have at least 4 pass/GCSEs at Grade C or above (one of which should be English or other relevant qualification).
  • For applicants wishing to pursue a career in Nursing they must have at
    least 5 GCSE Grade C or above.
  • Mature applicants who have worked in a social care setting in the recent past or have a related qualification
  • IELTS score of at least 5.5
Progression

Higher National Diploma in Health and Social Care

Employment Opportunities
  • Care Assistance/Supervisor
  • Support worker for disabled people and people with learning difficulties
  • Special Needs Assistant
  • Lecturer +Teaching Qualification
  • Health Promotion Specialist
  • Health Service Manager
  • Local Government Administrator
  • Nutritional Therapist
  • Physiotherapist
  • Probation Officer
  • Sales Executive, Medical
  • Social Worker
  • Lifestyle Consultant

Learning Outcome

On completion of this unit a learner should:

  1. Understand concepts of equality, diversity and rights in relation to health and social care
  2. Know discriminatory practices in health and social care
  3. Understand how national initiatives promote anti-discriminatory practice
  4. Know how anti-discriminatory practice is promoted in health and social care settings.

 

Understand concepts of equality, diversity and rights in relation to health and social care


Benefits of diversity: social/cultural, eg the arts, diet, education, language, cultural enrichment, tolerance,
social cohesion; economic, eg employment, expertise
Terminology: correct use of, eg equality, equity, diversity, rights, opportunity, difference, overt discrimination, covert discrimination, stereotyping, labelling, prejudice, disadvantage, beliefs, values, vulnerability, abuse, empowerment, independence, interdependence, racism, sexism, homophobia.


Settings: health and/or social care settings, eg residential, day care, nursing care, domiciliary care Active promotion of equality and individual rights in health and social care settings: principles of the care value base; putting the patient/service user at the heart of service provision, eg providing active support, promoting individuals' rights, choices and wellbeing, anti-discriminatory practice, empowering patients/service users; dealing with tensions and contradictions; staff development and training; practical implications of confidentiality, eg recording, reporting, storing and sharing of information.


Individual rights: the right to be respected, treated equally and not discriminated against, treated as an
individual, treated in a dignified way, allowed privacy, protected from danger and harm, allowed access to
information about themselves, be able to communicate using their preferred methods of communication
and language, cared for in a way that meets their needs, takes account of their choices and protects them

 

Know discriminatory practices in health and social care

Basis of discrimination: factors, eg culture, disabilities, age, social class, gender, sexuality, health status,
family status, cognitive ability
Discriminatory practice: types, eg infringement of rights, covert or overt abuse of power, prejudice,
stereotyping, labelling, bullying, abuse
Effects: marginalisation, disempowerment, low self-esteem and self-identity, restricted opportunities,
negative behaviours such as aggression or criminality
Loss of rights: overriding individual rights, eg by the use of power and force; statutory powers.

 

Understand how national initiatives promote anti-discriminatory practice

Conventions, legislation and regulations: relevant sections from, eg European Convention on Human
Rights and Fundamental Freedoms 1950, Sex Discrimination Act 1975, Mental Health Act 1983, Mental
Health (Northern Ireland) Order 1986, The Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989, The Children
Act 1989, Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000, Disability Discrimination Act 2005, Human Rights
Act 1998, Data Protection Act 1998, Nursing and Residential Care Homes Regulations 1984 (amended
2002), Care Standards Act 2000, The Children Act 2004, Disability Discrimination Act 2005, Mental
Capacity Act 2005, Age Discrimination Act 2006
Codes of practice and charters: codes of conduct established by professional bodies; General Social Care
Council/Care Council for Wales/Northern Ireland Social Care Council codes of practice and rules of
conduct for social care workers and employers; charters, eg entitlement to services
Organisational policies and procedures: positive promotion of, eg individual rights, advocacy, work practices,
staff development and training, quality issues, complaints procedures, affirmative action, anti-harassment,
confidentiality, human rights

 

Know how anti-discriminatory practice is promoted in health and social care settings

Active promotion of anti-discriminatory practice: ethical principles; putting the patient/service user at the
heart of service provision, eg providing active support consistent with the beliefs, culture and preferences
of the individual, supporting individuals to express their needs and preferences, empowering individuals,
promoting individuals' rights, choices and wellbeing; balancing individual rights with the rights of others;
dealing with conflicts; identifying and challenging discrimination
Personal beliefs and value systems: influences on, eg culture, beliefs, past events, socialisation,
environmental influences, health and wellbeing; developing greater self-awareness and tolerance of
differences; committing to the care value base; careful use of language; working within legal, ethical and
policy guidelines

 

     

    Unit Assessment

Assessment takes the form of written assignments, observations, in-class tests, verbal assessment and projects

To gain the unit learners must achieve, as a minimum, the Pass grade; the Pass grade is in effect the gaining of the credit for the unit, and this contributes to the overall qualification grade. All units must be passes within the rules of combination to achieve the overall qualification.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The table below shows the number of points scored per credit at the unit level and grade


Level Points per credit
  Pass Merit Distinction
5 7 8 9
6 9 10 11


Learners who achieve the correct number of points within the ranges shown in the 'qualification grade' tables below will achieve the qualification Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction* grades (or combinations of these grades appropriate to the qualification).

 

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